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Short Film Block 4: Delightfully Human

Friday evening’s presentation of the fourth Block of short films at the New Hampshire Film Festival in the Music Hall Loft was full of intriguing short films, from the totally absurd to the eerily familiar, and all of them with a delightfully human quality.

Fall River
Fall River

The first film of the block Fall River, a documentary produced and directed by Pat Heywood and Jamil McGinnis depicts Fall River, Massachusetts, named one of the worst cities to live in, with a very heartwarming account by one of its former residents. The film gives a fresh outlook on the idea that “home is where the heart is”.

Dios Nunca Muere
Dios Nunca Muere

Dios Nunca Muere, a subtitled Spanish drama transcends language barriers and illuminates the everyday struggle of a migrant family with vibrant performances by stars Monica del Carmen, Diego Sanchez and, Miley Cabanas. The film was written and directed by Barbara Cigarroa and produced by Julie O’ Leary. You can check out the films Facebook page here.

Funeral
Funeral

The live action/animated dark comedy short Funeral, written and produced by Leah Shore and Jonathan Federico and directed by Leah Shore is nothing short of delightfully inappropriate. Infusing elements of animated crass comedy into a period of mourning and then coming out with a beautiful story is what makes this unlikely film a winner. ­­­­­ You can check out the film’s Facebook page here and its Twitter page here.

The Water Slide
The Water Slide

Documentary film The Water Slide, delivers much like the tense ride it depicts: immediate expectation, twists and turns, and a satisfying conclusion. Directed by Nathan Truesdell and produced by J. Gonçalves, Jessica Kingdon and, Charlotte Cook this short documentary encapsulates the thoughts on everyone’s minds following an unexpected tragedy. You can find director Nathan Truesdell on Twitter here.

Writer and director Aly Migliori’s film After Her, ­­­due to its brevity and intense cinematography, is unlike most contemporary sci-fi mysteries. Produced by Laura Heberton and Zander Fife and starring Natalia Dyer and Christopher Dylan White, the film’s effects-driven style and unique plot provide a new twist on the “gone girl” archetype in film.

A Hand
A Hand

Based on a true story, A Hand, written and directed by Prashanth Kamalakanthan intends to extend the notions we have on harassment by showcasing in a single common event, a car ride, the embarrassment, naivete, and innocence inherent in society in the #MeToo era. Produced by Artemis Shaw and starring Ariel Kavoussi and Onur Tukel, the film is all too familiar in its portrayal of situational discomfort.

Brainworm Billy
Brainworm Billy

At only three minutes long, animated film Brainworm Billy, written and starring Max Rosenthal and produced and directed by Emily Hubley, is a stunning work of absurdist comedy that truly makes you rethink your perspective on veteran performer Billy Crystal.

Magic Bullet, written, directed, and produced by Amanda Lovejoy Street, along with Kelly Pendygraft as co-producer, is an emotionally engrossing film that demands you take up a mindset utterly foreign and then leaves you emotionally feeble. With performances that exude a mastery of subtlety and ability to emote, Rosemarie DeWitt and Molly Parker make this movie a dramatic success and examines the parallels between self-care and self-destructive behavior.

By Ken Severance-Camp

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